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As members of an organization widely considered to be the worst organization for new members, freshmen, or “fish,” in the Corps of Cadets expressed... <span class=Corps Freshmen Glad They Aren’t Sorority Littles" />

As members of an organization widely considered to be the worst organization for new members, freshmen, or “fish,” in the Corps of Cadets expressed sympathy for the new “littles” in sororities. Though freshmen cadets often seem like the most poorly-treated new members of any group on campus, many are glad they don’t face the systematic abuse of the “Big/Little” system. Many agree that it is better to have someone be overtly horrible than pretend to love them and be catty behind their back.

Crawling through the mud early on Wednesday morning, fish Jones was reportedly thankful he was not a sorority little. While being verbally abused by his upperclassmen and encouraged to quit, fish Jones was thankful for the honest dislike rather than feigned compassion. In addition, this harassment concluded with the opportunity to become a full member of the Corps.

Freshmen, known for complaining about the “abuse” they face, expressed their gratitude for the fact that passive aggression was less common in the Corps than in Greek life. “Being a fish is better than serving as an Instagram prop, getting dragged to parties, or being the sober sister for your big,” said fish Jones. “I would take being forced to eat in a peculiar way at Duncan over having to sit through awkward sorority family dinner dates.”

Another freshman expressed his gratitude over the Corps process in which you are treated poorly before being welcomed, rather than the opposite. “Being forced to earn my place in the group, allowed me to form a true brotherhood with my fellow fish,” said freshman political science major Colin Agnew. “I’ve never had to doubt my relationship with by classmates. What we have to deal with binds us together.”

The opinion is not only commonplace amongst the class of 2021, but shared with their upperclassmen as well. “My girlfriend is in a sorority and talked about “sisterhood” all recruitment, but constantly complains about the drama,” said Audie Custo, a sophomore philosophy major. “I am glad I can just yell at [the fish] and be horrible to their faces; I don’t have to pretend I enjoy being around them.”

Covered in mud and sweat, fish Jones stood in line with his sixteen fish buddies as their sophomores, the masterminds of their torment, went down the line congratulating them and pinning their Corps Brass on their combat uniforms. The semester of hardship far outweighed anything a big, or the round of gifts, could have provided.

 

—Lil’ Event & Netflix and Drill

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